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More on supplementation


Supplements are products that are intended to supplement the diet and contain one or more dietary ingredients such as vitamins, minerals, herbs, amino acids, or other substances. The suggested total of supplements varies depending on the type of supplement and the individual's fitness goals. Some popular supplements include protein powder, creatine, caffeine, beta-alanine, and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs).



Protein powder is a common supplement used for muscle building and recovery. The suggested total of protein intake for athletes is 1.2 to 2 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day, according to the International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) (1). However, the optimal amount of protein supplementation depends on individual factors such as training status, age, and body composition. Whey protein is a popular protein supplement because it is high in essential amino acids and is quickly absorbed by the body (2).


Creatine is a supplement that is used to improve athletic performance by increasing energy production in muscles. The suggested total of creatine supplementation is 3 to 5 grams per day, according to the ISSN (3). Creatine has been shown to increase muscle strength, power, and lean body mass in numerous studies (4).


Caffeine is a stimulant that is commonly found in coffee and energy drinks. It is also a popular supplement for athletes as it can improve endurance performance and reduce fatigue. The suggested total of caffeine intake for performance enhancement is 3 to 6 milligrams per kilogram of body weight, according to the ISSN (5). However, caffeine intake should be individualized based on tolerance and sensitivity.


Beta-alanine is a non-essential amino acid that is used to improve high-intensity exercise performance by buffering lactic acid. The suggested total of beta-alanine supplementation is 4 to 6 grams per day, according to the ISSN (6). Beta-alanine has been shown to improve exercise performance in multiple studies (7).


BCAAs are a group of essential amino acids that are commonly found in protein-rich foods such as meat, fish, and eggs. BCAAs are popular supplements for athletes as they can improve muscle recovery and reduce muscle damage. The suggested total of BCAA supplementation is 5 to 20 grams per day, according to the ISSN (8). However, the efficacy of BCAA supplementation is debated in the scientific community, and some studies have found no significant benefits (9).


It is important to note that the quality and purity of supplements can vary between manufacturers. The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates dietary supplements, but it does not test or approve supplements before they are marketed. The best way to ensure the quality of a supplement is to choose a reputable brand that has been third-party tested for purity and potency. Some reputable third-party testing organizations include NSF International, Informed-Sport, and ConsumerLab.com.


The suggested total of supplements varies depending on the type of supplement and the individual's fitness goals. It is important to choose a reputable brand that has been third-party tested for purity and potency to ensure the quality of the supplement.


Some supplement brand I trust and recommend are Thorne and JYM. I recommend Thorne for athletes as it is NSF certified. For everyone else, I recommend JYM. I'm not saying JYM is "tainted" but when it comes to collegiate or pro sports we want to see 3rd party testing to ensure there will be no positive outcomes during the athletes drug testing.


Yours in health,


Coach Ry


  1. Jäger R, Kerksick CM, Campbell BI, et al. International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: protein and exercise. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2017;14:20. doi:10.1186/s12970-017-0177-8

  2. Tang JE, Moore DR, Kujbida GW, Tarnopolsky MA, Phillips SM. Ingestion of whey hydrolysate, casein, or soy protein isolate: effects on mixed muscle protein synthesis at rest and following resistance exercise in young men. J Appl Physiol. 2009;107(3):987-992. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00076.2009

  3. Kreider RB, Kalman DS, Antonio J, et al. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: safety and efficacy of creatine supplementation in exercise, sport, and medicine. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2017;14:18. doi:10.1186/s12970-017-0173-z

  4. Cooper R, Naclerio F, Allgrove J, Jimenez A. Creatine supplementation with specific view to exercise/sports performance: an update. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2012;9(1):33. doi:10.1186/1550-2783-9-33

  5. Goldstein ER, Ziegenfuss T, Kalman D, et al. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2010;7(1):5. doi:10.1186/1550-2783-7-5

  6. Trexler ET, Smith-Ryan AE, Stout JR, et al. International society of sports nutrition position stand: beta-alanine. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2015;12(1):30. doi:10.1186/s12970-015-0090-y

  7. Saunders B, Elliott-Sale K, Artioli GG, et al. β-alanine supplementation to improve exercise capacity and performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Br J Sports Med. 2017;51(8):658-669. doi:10.1136/bjsports-2016-096396

  8. Shimomura Y, Inaguma A, Watanabe S, et al. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation before squat exercise and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2010;20(3):236-244. doi:10.1123/ijsnem.20.3.236

  9. Stoppani J, Scheett T, Pena J, Rudolph C, Charlebois D. Consuming branched-chain amino acid supplement during a resistance training program increases lean mass, muscle strength and fat loss. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2009;6(Suppl 1):P1. doi:10.1186/1550-2783-6-s1-p1

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